How an existing diabetes drug controls cancer!

diabetese drug

New research suggests that targeting a particular cell signalling pathway with the diabetes drug metformin might offer a way to stop the progression and spread of pancreatic cancer.

The study — which was led by Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick — is to feature at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, which will be held in Chicago, IL.

This study is not the first to suggest metformin as a potential treatment for pancreatic cancer, but it is the first to show that the underlying mechanism involves the drug’s effect on the Rearranged during Transfection (RET) cell signalling pathway.

Pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is a cancer that starts in the cells of the pancreas, which is an organ behind the stomach that helps with digestion and blood sugar control.

The estimates for the United States suggest that around 55,440 people will find out that they have pancreatic cancer in 2018, and approximately 44,330 people will die of the disease.

Though it is only responsible for 3 percent of all cancers in the U.S., pancreatic cancer accounts for around 7 percent of deaths from cancer.

Because pancreatic cancer is hard to detect in the early stages, most cases are not diagnosed until the disease has started to spread. This makes it harder to treat and often leaves people with much poorer prospects compared with other types of cancer. By